“ For electronic recipients of Computergram International the last story is a little difficult. The nearest this electronic sub editor can get is to ask you to imagine the Old Spice advert, except that rather than a muscular antipodean on a surf board, you should imagine a muscular antipodean on an 80286 upgrade board. For those who cannot allow their imagination to extend this far, refer to the hardcopy C.I. or the Hypertec Pty press release (enough said). ”

Coté Memo #040: Market cycles in infrastructure software, still more OpenStack action

Meta-data

Hello again, welcome to #040. Today we have 49 subscribers, so we’re +3. What happened?! I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

Sponsors

Follow-up

  • There was diverse feedback to my research agenda question from yesterday. One person suggested focusing on points of friction that customers are facing, another of you on re-framing DevOps to be “all that stuff needed to become a coding business” (my rephrasing), and yet another in a more commercial sense: what will people pay for? All good input that’s given me plenty to think about.

  • One of the key things to fall out of the various conversations is being more straight forward with the “what I really think” content. Oddly enough, in the analyst world, this is not as easy as you may think. One theory being kicked around in the inbox is to “give away” the facts and to charge for opinion. That is, put “what I really think” behind a paywall. As I said in the thread on the topic, I almost do the opposite nowadays. It’s something to think more on in the endless analyst business model noodling I do. You got opinions? As an example, listen to the last 20 minutes (sort of accidentally recorded) of the most recent Exponent podcast. I think it’s some of the best, most valuable work that podcast has done. I didn’t think of big Apple event at all like they do…and now I do! (There’s also good cultural commentary on Asian luxury buying habits.)

  • I’m sure you’re thinking, “hey, Coté. I know you try to release and UnderDevelopment.io podcast every two weeks. What up?” Well, we have a recording in the can. It just needs some editing. SORRY! (I’ll be recording Software Defined Talk this week remotely. We’ll see how that goes!)

Tech & Work World

Quick Hits

Systems Management Cycles: best of breed vs. full suite

On the plane today I started working on a piece considering the question, “should we make a platform out of all our point products?” In that context, I ended up typing up one of my core cycle theories for how the systems management market works. The below is just a first draft, pardon errors and stupidity.

The “infrastructure software” layer in the IT stack is that sinewy and sometimes well marbled layer between the hardware and the application layer: operating systems, cloud platforms, systems and cloud management tools, and all the other software required to keep the applications (or “services” if you were indoctrinated properly in the mid-2000s) running and healthy. These are the concerns of the “sysadmin”: managing the servers at the operating system level, ensuring the network is properly functioning, deploying and configuring the applications (custom written or packaged), managing requests for modifying the software, and then monitoring the performance of all of it so that end-users have the best (or, at least, agreed on) level of performance possible.

This diverse range of responsibilities and the vast array of vendors out available to satisfy each need creates an panoply of tools that a sysadmin can use to do their work. As with most IT, there’s an ongoing cycle of “does everything suite” vs. “best-of-breed” products in the industry. Currently, for example, as the new technologies needed to run and manage cloud penetrate into the enterprise (based on our studies, we reckon that most companies are well through virtualization and now onto cloud), it feels like we’re in a best-of-breed phase of the cycle: no single suite of tools can manage everything perfectly or match the all of the diverse use cases in the market.

In this initial phase of a technology market (as we are in with cloud) startups who seek to move faster and take on more risk than incumbents find holes in the suite approaches and prosper because they offer better performance, often at lower costs.

We’ve seen this happen in systems management, for example, with Splunk going against Big 4 log management tools and APM vendors such as New Relic and AppDynamics out-innovating the slower moving incumbents early in this phase of APM.

A similar cycle occurred with virtualization management with many vendors offering better ways to manage VMware clusters than VMware itself. Several years ago, virtualization market seemed to cluster back up into suite approaches with VMware and others buying up point tools. Atlassian in the developer tools space used disruptive approaches to go-to-market to peddle genuinely innovative developer tools to make trouble for the incumbent application life-cycle vendors.

Successful, best of breed, nimble tools often become the stable but innovation-listing incumbents for a new batch of startups.

As another ask, I’m trying to track down and “fact check” the idea that the Tivoli Framework was very problematic. People always talk about it, but I don’t know if I have any good write-ups on hand. Anyone have some pointers or first hand experience?

Rewrite brought to you by CA

Traveling

As you may know, I’m interested in CA’s marketing and brand transformation. Like Compuware, they seem to have simplified their face, as it were, a lot. While in JFK for a layover, I noticed CA had a lot of ads up. Above is one of the more interesting ones. It’s very "digital enterprise"/”coding business”/"bi-modal IT"/"third platform" (pick you favorite analyst/pundit phrase). Good for them.

I like the "we’re gonna spend the next 10 years rewriting all the software" hyperbole I start most of my talks with. But of course I’d like it.

Fun & IRL

If pictures of CA advertising in JFK aren’t “fun” for you, I don’t know why you subscribe to this thing!

(No, please don’t leave.)

Coté Memo #039: research agenda crafting, what Docker will spend $40m on, RAX no longer for sale

Meta-data

Hello again, welcome to #039. Today we have 46 subscribers, so we’re +1. Dandy! I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

Sponsors

Follow-up

Tech & Work World

Quick Hits

This [cash injection] puts us in a great position to invest aggressively in the future of distributed applications. We’ll be able to significantly expand and build the Docker platform and our ecosystem of developers, contributors, and partners, while developing a broader set of solutions for enterprise users. … Look for significant advances in orchestration, clustering, scheduling, storage, and networking. You’ll also see continued advances in the overall Docker platform–both Docker Hub and Docker Engine.

And a fun diagram:

The Docker roadmap

What cloud vendor d'ya like?

Research Agenda Decisions

I have three options (OK, four) of what I should focus on in my analyst work in front of me and I’d be curious to hear your input:

  1. DevOps - we’ve done plenty of coverage here and there, but if you recall back in #028, we could do with a more rigorous and deep research agenda here.
  2. Software Development - when I was hired, this was an area that needed filling and I certainly would like to. As with DevOps, all of us fill it in well but we might could do with more focus on it.
  3. Plain of systems management, virtualization, etc. - while folks on my team cover APM, cloud platforms, and other areas, we don’t have a dedicated focus (again, with that rigor and depth I outlined for DevOps).
  4. Continue to be a be broad and cover all of the above, but with the more shallow depth that comes from broad coverage.

As I mentioned, at the team level we cover all the three items above. The question is what I should spend “all of my time doing.” In each of the three real options above, I could easily talk with only companies and end-users in those areas, spend “all my time” focused on researching and writing just one of them. My question to you, dear readers, is what you would (a.) find most valuable, and, (b.) what you think would be the best (criteria: commercially valuable, interesting, fun people to talk with, etc.) area for me to focus on (separate from of your needs).

I’ve equivocated many times solid answers for all four of the above, so outside feedback would be helpful.

Travel

Travel is starting up again, oh boy. I’m off to Boston later this week, Chicago next week, then HCTS (you can still get $200 off, see above!) in Las Vegas, BMC’s conference in Orlando, Paris for the OpenStack Summit, CA World in Las Vegas, and Toronto for a TechTarget speaking engagement. So far, beyond that, things look clear.

Fun & IRL

No fun today, just work.

Coté Memo #038: No title, just links

Meta-data

Hello again, welcome to #038. Today we have 45 subscribers, so we’re +2. Fun! I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

Sponsors

Tech & Work World

Busy day - and coming week - so just the quick hits for today.

Quick Hits

Hey, they just need faster Internet - "waitress, another Dewars!"

Mark drove though West Texas recently and noted how desolate it was, with photos! I typed up the below as a comment, but got trapped in some login madness, so here it is:

We lived a month in Marathon, Texas in 2010 or 2009 It was nice. To your point, there’s not much going on out there (by us city folks’s standards). It took 2 hours to get to an airport (El Paso) and the Internet was slow (I had to go to the Sul Ross library to do a webcast, as I recall).

It seemed to me, though, that if you had faster Internet, things would actually be very nice for a remote worker. I suppose the schools wouldn’t be as good as the “big city” schools, and your dog might get eaten by a javelina. Still, all those abandoned buildings must be dirt cheap and people generally leave each other alone out there.

I suppose that’s sort of a parasitic view of decaying Texas, but I think there’s lots of people who’s be glad to dump their cash into land and housing out there if there was good “first world” infrastructure in place.

Fun & IRL

We started back on some Andersons coffee today and man, it’s rocket fuel!

Coté Memo #037: vRealize report, PaaS winnowing, big hunks of turkey

Meta-data

Hello again, welcome to #037. Today we have 43 subscribers, so we’re +1. I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

Sponsors

Follow-up

  • 451 Deal Analysis of HP buying Eucalyptus - As I mentioned yesterday, we had a Deal Analysis in the works. Here it is.
  • That vRealize report is finally up. I spend much of the time going over the strategic reasons for doing this and much less on the actual features. I figure there’ll be more at the BCN VMworld so we’ll look to cover it more in-depth then. Coincidently, I had an end-user inquiry today that talked all about vRealize and its competitors. The customer was well trained: they said “vRealize” and never “vCAC”!
  • This is the kind of feedback I find most valuable (I’m serious!):

Tech & Work World

Quick Hits

Fun & IRL

No fun today, just work. I’m going to go have a martini.

VMware consolidates its systems and cloud management suite into vRealize, with SaaS

Usage of VMware tools

My brief report of VMware re-swizzling it’s cloud management tools into the “vRealize” brand is up now. More than just a re-branding, the intention is to systematically refactor the collection of tolls (vCAC, Log Insights, their “cloud business” tools, and others) into a set of more stand-alone services that can be composed into different combinations, sort of microservices oriented, maybe. Here’s the 451 Take:

As we’ve noted previously, the VMware management portfolio had started to get too large to easily comprehend. Traditional Big Four vendors have long faced this challenge of simplifying their suites. The goal here is not only to make it easier for customers to evaluate and decide what to buy, but to make using the functionality in the suite easier for end users. The contrast between large suites of products and best-of-breed ‘products’ comes up most sharply in transition periods like the movement from plain old virtualization to cloud that we’re currently seeing. With the large portfolio it’s built and acquired over the years, VMware must do this consolidation to compete with best-of-breed competitors. It will take time. One positive note is that the use of SaaS may help defeat the perilous path of integrating the road maps and architectures of previously independent products if VMware can convince customers to go the ITMaaS route… a task in which others like ServiceNow are finding great success.

Much of the time is spent explaining why VMware would do this rather than speeds and feeds’ing through the software. 451 clients can read the full report, or apply for a trial if you’d like to take a peek.

Coté Memo #036: HP buys Eucalyptus, mind-mapping-aaS

Meta-data

Hello again, welcome to #036. Today we have 42 subscribers, so we’re +/0. Steady as she goes! I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

Sponsors

Tech & Work World

Quick Hits

HP buys Eucalyptus

The addition of Marten to HP’s world-class Cloud leadership team will strengthen and accelerate the strategy we’ve had in place for more than three years, which is to help businesses build, consume and manage open source hybrid clouds,” said Whitman. “Marten will enhance HP’s outstanding bench of Cloud executives and expand HP Helion capabilities, giving customers more choice and greater control of private and hybrid cloud solutions.

We cover this in Software Defined Talk today. I start with some context on HP, Eucalyptus, OpenStack, and “AWS compatibility.” It’s nice to have three different perspectives.

As you can conclude from the discussion, I find it both perplexing and exciting. As we say in SDT, from a customer perspective “I want an AWS-compatible cloud that just works (as much as a private cloud can)” it makes sense; from a portfolio perspective (“which HP cloud did you want buy?”) it seems to add confusion. I suggest giving them some time to explain their plans. Should be fun in Paris at the upcoming OpenStack Summit.

We have a 451 Deal Analysis report on this in the works and it’ll hopefully be out tomorrow. In the mean time, check out Barb Darrow’s quick coverage.

MindMeister

I signed up for a paid account at MindMeister today. I think I like it. I’m eager to see how the mobile part works.

Also, it was cool that it has 2FA and uses the Google Authenticator. I poked around and it turns out Evernote does as well. For some reason, I love that!

Fun & IRL

No fun today, just work.

Coté Memo #035 - Is Docker a threat to OpenStack, NPC in servers, OCP too expensive?, etc.

Meta-data

I’m shipping mid-day. Let’s see what happens!

Hello again, welcome to #035. Today we have 42 subscribers, so we’re +1. Fun! I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

Sponsors

Tech & Work World

Quick Hits

Is Docker a threat to OpenStack?

We get questions like this a lot. Here’s the swag du jour:

I think they’re complimentary. OpenStack is more about orchestrating and manage large clouds, where-as Docker alone is at the single node level. Docker should be looked at as two things: (a.) more efficient virtualization, but that likely works on less workloads than virtualization (at the moment), and, (b.) a developer-friendly way to package up applications for deployment into cloud and cloud-like environments (as well as non-cloud infrastructure).

Docker is a threat to virtualization, primarily. Systems like Mesosphere, CoreOS, and Kubernetes (I don’t understand it well enough, but I think it fits here) that use (or could use) things like Docker are more a threat to OpenStack. Why? Developers building applications could find the stripped down management and orchestration in those systems more than good enough and not go in for the “bigger plate of hassle” that OpenStack brings. The question becomes: is OpenStack “over” (managing how these things are used) those, or “under” (managed by and used a fungible resource) them?

As with all “threats” to OpenStack, the key question is: can these alternatives get into a production ready, get up and running in less than a day state before OpenStack does? I.e.: “OpenStack is hard, our stuff is easy.”

Fun & IRL

  • RE/Search - in the pre-web days, I loved these books. I don’t think I ever bought one, but I always sought them at at Half-Priced Books and thumbed through them. Now of course, we have the web.

Coté Memo #034: No longer blending iPhones, Applefornia, Developer Relations & Marketing

Meta-data

Hello again, welcome to #034. Today we have 41 subscribers, so we’re +/-0. I’d love to hear what you like, dislike, your feedback, etc.: memo@cote.io. (If you’re reading this on the web, you should subscribe to get the daily email.)

See past newsletters in the archives, and, as always, see things as they come at Cote.io and @cote.

Sponsors

Follow-up

Tech & Work World

Quick Hits

Finally, I’ll be getting a new phone

Obviously, there was a big Apple event today. I’m overdue getting a new phone (I’ve got an iPhone 4s!), so I’ll be shelling some cash out once it’s available; I’ll see what kind of AT&T discount I get. I finally waited until I was due a new phone, so hopefully not that much.

Like most people I saw, I was impressed by the Apple Watch more than I thought. I like how Apple just kept piling on functionality to it. Pretty Amazing.

Kevin Lynch shows off the Apple Watch

It was also fun to see Kevin Lynch in action. I used to work with him in tiny ways, mostly over lunches, when he was at Adobe. He always seemed like a very genuine, very smart guy who actually had a passion for computers. I think that came through in his talk today. He had a nice sense of humor too which popped up a tad. Last we saw, he was blending iPhones, but you know, because the cause.

Applefornia

The other thing I find fascinating is the weird world that Apple’s personas all exist in. It’s somewhere between stock photos at Target and the mall, and high-end PowerPoint clip-art. I like to think of it as Applefornia: that cool, ocean-filled place where people seem to constantly be on vacation and covering them selves with patinaware. That Umberto Eco should write an essay on it.

Developer relations and marketing

At our upcoming HCTS cloud conference (look above for more info and discount code if you want to register), I’ll be doing a short talk on developer relations and marketing, followed by a panel on the topic.

I put together a first, incomplete draft of the slides. Take a gander and tell me if you have any feedback:

I’m not sure where I came up with that title, but it looks like something I’d type…

Fun & IRL

No fun today, just work.

1 of 107
Load More Posts
Sorry, No More Posts
Loading...