“ However, a source familiar with Dropbox’s current strategy said the company lately has been moving more of its IT infrastructure away from AWS and onto its own turf. There are now 10,000 servers in Dropbox facilities running loads that had been on Amazon EC2, although it’s not clear what percentage of Dropbox’s computing requirements that represents. Dropbox is currently storing data both in its own data centers and on Amazon S3 until the end of the year, this source said. ”
Slow week.

As always, see them as they come in flickr.
Aperture
f/2.4
Shutter Speed
1/20th
ISO
80
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
iPhone 4S
Slow week.

As always, see them as they come in flickr.
Aperture
f/2.4
Shutter Speed
1/120th
ISO
1600
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
iPhone 4S
Slow week.

As always, see them as they come in flickr.
Aperture
f/2.4
Shutter Speed
1/120th
ISO
50
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
iPhone 4S
Slow week.

As always, see them as they come in flickr.
Aperture
f/2.4
Shutter Speed
1/120th
ISO
100
Focal Length
4mm
Camera
iPhone 4S
Slow week.

As always, see them as they come in flickr.

Slow week.

As always, see them as they come in flickr.

Summary

Finishing projects is hard, starting them is easy. That said, the moment of starting a project is critical, and assembling the team is incredibly impotent. We discuss that staff boot-strapping and the types of people who are good and not good for starting projects. We also discuss microservices and how this emerging style of architecture can help the product and business side out.

Subscribe to the feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/UnderDevPodcast, or download the MP3 directly if you prefer.

Your friends @cote and @BillHiggins

Starting teams:

  • Projects don’t start often, most of them are “old” ones
  • Bill’s “special projects” LinkedIn status.
  • Keeping a list of people you’d want on your team
  • Recruiting the people - the painful part is the extraction process, moving them from their existing work to the new work
  • Finishing stuff is hard, starting is easy
  • While the project may come and go, the people have probably worked together several times before
  • Check out the Apple take, according to “Mr Ive.”

Microservices

  • We try to summarize the thinking behind microservices. Other than pointing to existing things - the web - we think of it as “SOA that works this time.”
  • Based on this great write-up from James Lewis and Martin Fowler.
  • Coté’s mindmap on the topic.
  • They seemed to loose track of “speed” in SOA, where-as microservices is very focused on shipping, not perfectly modeling
  • We discuss the “business benefit” of mashups, composite applications, and thus, microservices architecting: enabling experimenting on the side, like all the Evernote apps… pace layering at the architectural layer means you can pace layer at the product management level.

softwaredefinedtalk:

Summary

Matt Ray is at OSCON, which prompts Brandon and I to reflect on open source a bit. We then discuss CA Technologies recent quarterly earnings call, who wins in the $600m AWS CIA deal, Yahoo buying Flury, and, as always, our recommendations for the week.

Subscribe: http://feeds.feedburner.com/SoftwareDefinedTalk

With Brandon Whichard, Matt Ray, and Coté.

If you like video, see this episodes’ video recording.

Show-notes:

  • OSCON is going on. People aren’t as ardent about open source as the used to be. It seems like open core pretty much won. There’s also [good slides](from Andrew Shafer reminded us about the business part of open source).

  • We discuss CA Technologies’ recent quarterly earnings call. Coté went and added comments to the transcriptt and would appreciate your input, dear listeners, on it: “is that a thing?”

  • This also prompts much discussion of the challenges in changing companies from “elephant hunting” to “marmet hunting,” the “Solarwinds++” model of selling.

  • Speaking of CA, there’s some new allegations in their APM legal-hijinks with AppDynamics. We discuss the practice of lawsuits and why companies do them, and what the desired outcomes, and therefore tactics seem to be.

  • That $600m AWS public private cloud for the CIA looks like it’ll close: “What we were really looking at was time to mission and innovation,” said “a former intelligence official”

  • Yahoo bought Flury a mobile analytics company. Coté relates some figures and analysis from the 451 deal analysis piece: “used by more than 170,000 developers in 150 countries… more than 400,000 applications.”

Recommendations

  • Brandon: for product management, try talking to 100 prospective customers.

  • Coté: sesame seed oil is delicious, don’t forget to use it for flavor.

CA Technologies FY2015Q1 marginalia, experimenting with CriticMarkup

Screenshot of markdowning next to rendering

While reading through CA’s recent quarterly conference call transcript, I thought I’d try out an idea I had this morning: using CriticMarkup to DIY what Genius.com does: annotating content. It worked OK, except I didn’t invest time in getting the HTML output right, so it looks kind of crappy - you can see the raw markdown file as well.

I actually tried using Genuis.com as well, but it started acting goofy so I gave up.

I’d love to be able to do more of these, but I need to get the publishing part right. The HTML is actually pretty simple, I just need a good stylesheet and (I’m guessing) some JavaScript. Any takers to help out?

“ I’m okay but not great at managing my time. In addition to being an editor and writer on my radio show, I’m also the boss, and deal with budgets, personnel stuff, revenue and spending questions, and business decisions. My worst habit: when I should be writing something for this week’s show, I’ll procrastinate by looking over some contract or making some business phone call or doing something else that actually isn’t as important as writing. Which is to say: I procrastinate by working. I wonder if that’s common. ”

Ira Glass

At least us worker-cum-management types aren’t alone.

The interview also has a nice list of stuff he as This American Life us, including lots of Google Docs!

“ So no, this isn’t helping. This is externalisation of cost. This is shirking of responsibility. This is not using technology the way it should be used, or the way it could be used, but the way that it can be used to inflict maximum possible harm - to provide the illusion of choice without actually enabling better choices. ”

Episode One Hundred and Twenty Six: Solving The Problem

When I was at RedMonk, I had to buy my own health insurance. Yes it’s a stupid nightmare and no one really cares enough to fix it. Good luck storming the castle.

One of my colleagues, Jay Lyman, and I were on the DevOps Cafe podcast a while back. We talk about DevOps from a mainstream perspective, and a bit about how analyst think about it. The episode was “lost” since our original recording, but is now found and published. There’s also some brief shownotes on their site, and the video of our recording if you prefer that over audio only.

(Source: devopscafe.org)

1 of 98
Load More Posts
Sorry, No More Posts
Loading...